Endodontics

PlasmaDent: Breakthrough Technology for Dental Hygiene and Dentistry

PlasmaDent:  Breakthrough Technology for Dental Hygiene and Dentistry

The emergence of low temperature atmospheric pressure plasma (LTAPP) is becoming a groundbreaking field of research. This course provides an overview of plasma science and what is possible for the future of dentistry.

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Irrigation in Endodontics

Irrigation in Endodontics

In this course, Markus Haapsalo, DDS, PhD analyzes the significance behind irrigation in endodontics, including goals, functions, and suggested protocols that dental professionals should consider for successful treatment to ensue. This course also reviews the etiology and pathogenesis of diseases like pulpitis and apical periodontitis, and discusses various irrigation solutions that are recommended throughout this process.

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Endodontic and Implant Therapies: Evidence-Based Decision Making

Endodontic and Implant Therapies: Evidence-Based Decision Making

The decision between endodontics and implant therapy can be difficult because the goals for both are the same: restore the patients’ dentition. Over the last few years, the industry has leaned towards implants, but before that decision can be made, many factors must be considered. This course reviews these decision making factors to show how specific situations call for one procedure over another.

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Mechanical Objectives for Cleaning and Shaping Root Canal Systems

Mechanical Objectives for Cleaning and Shaping Root Canal Systems

Successful endodontic therapy depends upon complete debridement by thoroughly cleaning and shaping the root canal system. When practitioners make every effort to understand and fulfill the five mechanical objectives behind this fundamental process, then the outcome of endodontic treatment will certainly be favorable as well as consistent.

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Infection Control

Infection Control Is Not Optional: Dental Practitioners Need to Be Involved

Infection Control Is Not Optional:  Dental Practitioners Need to Be Involved

Failure to comply with infection control standards increases the risk for disease transmission and jeopardizes patient safety. The course reviews the occurrence of healthcare associated infections (HAIs) and then delves deeper into recent infection control breaches in dentistry and how not only the patients, but the dental practitioners themselves, were impacted.

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Oral Manifestations of Sexually Transmitted Infections

Oral Manifestations of Sexually Transmitted Infections

The transmission of infection within the dental office is one of the biggest concerns for oral health professionals. This course focuses on certain diseases known as sexually transmitted infections (STIs), which have oral manifestations that can be detected by dental professionals. It reviews the most common types of STIs in the U.S. today, including some of the newer infections (such as HPV) that have emerged within the past decade.

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Infection Control in the Dental Office: Why is it Important? What are the Standards of Care?

Infection Control in the Dental Office: Why is it Important? What are the Standards of Care?

The transmission of infection in a dental practice is one of the most serious issues the industry can face, which is why it is so important that everyone in the dental office be aware of the most recent protocols to reduce the overall risk. As a result, understanding the most updated standards to further prevent this transmission is essential for every dental practice.

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Colds and Flu: What Oral Health Providers Should Know

Colds and Flu: What Oral Health Providers Should Know

Colds and flu are a part of life, but their spread can be minimized through basic infection control principles within the dental setting. This course details the microbiology and transmission of colds and flu, infection control and/or preventive measures to limit the spread of colds and flu, and ways to identify those in critical need of vaccination.

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Breaking Down Dental Silos with Electronic Health Records

Breaking Down Dental Silos with Electronic Health Records

Significant changes in the way dentistry is being practiced have recently been set in motion by two influential factors: science and evidence-based decision making. One way that dental offices can ensure their patients are treated in a safe, and controlled environment is by transitioning from traditional to an electronic health records system for improved diagnostics, quicker communication, and reduced infection transmission.

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Eco-Friendly Surface Disinfectants

Eco-Friendly Surface Disinfectants

Being environmentally responsible has become a major goal for many dental practices across the U.S. One of the most common strategies for being green in the dental office is to utilize products—such as surface disinfectants—that have a low environmental impact, but are equally as effective and adequately meet the latest OSHA and CDC standards/guidelines for oral health practitioners.

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Antimicrobial Resistance: A 21st Century Public Health Threat

Antimicrobial Resistance: A 21st Century Public Health Threat

As the widespread use and misuse of antibiotic/antimicrobial drugs continues in present-day healthcare, more and more cases are being reported that first-line drugs are failing to resolve a number of infections from the evolution of resistant organisms. Furthermore, this phenomenon is not limited to only bacteria, but also antiviral, antifungal, and antiparasitic drugs as well, which are rapidly becoming less and less effective as increased use persists.

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Infection Control and Safety during Humanitarian Dental Missions

Infection Control and Safety during Humanitarian Dental Missions

Dental professionals can provide an abundance of support to communities in need of dental assistance. When it comes to delivering care, whether it is in a clinical setting or a location lacking vital resources, the main concern should be the safety of both the dental team and the clients. This course covers the essential information for establishing safe surroundings for humanitarian dental missions; including: personal safety precautions, client safety measures, and how to establish a clean-care environment.

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The Dental Handpiece: Maintenance and Infection Control

The Dental Handpiece: Maintenance and Infection Control

The dental handpiece is one of the most commonly used and essential devices found in the dental office. This course will touch on the importance of infection control by means of the timeline of the handpiece, regulatory issues, classification, and the manufacturer’s maintenance requirements.

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Oral-Systemic

The Link between HPV and Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinomas

The Link between HPV and Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinomas

This course presents evidence from the scientific literature regarding the link between infection with this epithelial-tropic virus and this subtype of cancer. The mechanistic events occurring within a cell that lead to transformation to cancer will be discussed, along with the clinical and histopathological appearance of HPV-induced OPSCC, techniques for diagnosis, and patient prognosis.

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Overview of Autoimmune Diseases for Oral Health Professionals

Overview of Autoimmune Diseases for Oral Health Professionals

Professionals in the dental industry are quickly becoming an integral part in the identification and diagnosis of various systemic diseases. This course, in particular, focuses on the wide variety of autoimmune diseases, and the associated risk factors and oral hygiene considerations that dental professionals must be aware of before treating patients with this type of disorder.

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Blood Pressure Issues for the Dental Office

Blood Pressure Issues for the Dental Office

While high blood pressure is recognized as the “silent killer” throughout the U.S., it is rarely associated with any kind of preventive measures in the dental office. As a considerable portion of the general public attends regular dental appointments every year, it should be more well-known that oral health professionals can play a vital role in the detection and management of hypertension.

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Salivary Diagnostics in Dentistry

Salivary Diagnostics in Dentistry

Salivary diagnostics is quickly becoming one of dentistry’s most promising tools in the detection and prevention of oral-systemic diseases. This course also discusses the many diseases it can detect, in addition to the products that are now available to the oral health community, and other recent advancements in this field.

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Obstructive Sleep Apnea and The Role of Dental Professionals

Obstructive Sleep Apnea and The Role of Dental Professionals

Throughout the dental industry, there is a very limited understanding on one of the most trending disorders in America today—Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA). In response, this course reviews the most current findings on the pathophysiology of OSA, its clinical symptoms, the role dentists play, and comparisons between adults and children with this condition.

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Oral Health Considerations during Cancer Treatment

Oral Health Considerations during Cancer Treatment

A detailed overview of everything dental professionals need to know about treating patients who have been diagnosed with some type of cancer, and are undergoing therapies that may adversely affect the state of oral health. From identifying who these patients are to the many common (and uncommon) side effects of chemotherapy and radiation, this course gives a first-hand explanation of what to expect and what to look out for when treating these patients from the stage of diagnosis until total recovery.

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Preventive

An Evidence-Based Approach to Cleansing and Polishing: Part I

An Evidence-Based Approach to Cleansing and Polishing: Part I

This course explores one of the most common procedures in dental hygiene practice (coronal polishing) from an evidenced-based perspective. Overall, the clinician should use the best research evidence, clinical expertise and professional judgment when considering polishing in the dental hygiene care plan.

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Remineralization, Protection, and the Caries Experience

Remineralization, Protection, and the Caries Experience

Although the amount of caries among younger patients has been decreasing in the past decades, this disease is far from being extinct. This is becoming a prevalent disease with a greater number of older patients, with emerging cases showing an overlap between caries and periodontal disease, the subject of the caries experience is a vital one within the dental industry.

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An Evidence-Based Approach to Cleansing and Polishing: Part II

An Evidence-Based Approach to Cleansing and Polishing: Part II

It is recommended that clinicians educate their patients on both the benefits and risks that are associated with cleansing and polishing (selective stain removal), as no scientific evidence has been found to support its therapeutic purpose. Part II of this course takes an in-depth look at selective polishing with a concentration on restorative materials, and how and when they should be cleansed and polished as part of dental hygiene care.

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Concerns for the Child Patient

Concerns for the Child Patient

With primary teeth developing a child’s future dental health by guiding permanent teeth into their positions, it is important for the oral health team to recognize the opportunity to educate children on the benefits of oral health. At a young age, the new experience of the dental office can leave a young patient leaving fearful, but this course will cover how to make a child patient feel comfortable, while also promoting self-oral hygiene.

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Risk Factors for Periodontal Disease

Risk Factors for Periodontal Disease

With periodontal disease affecting nearly 80% of adults across the US, dental professionals have the distinct responsibility to educate patients about the risk factors and potential warning signs of this common oral condition. This course also reviews the different stages of periodontal disease, as well as the physical and psychological side effects and clinical guidelines for assessing the overall severity once a diagnosis has been made.

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Access to Care

Access to Care

For some, maintaining good oral health is simply not as easy as it is for others because of outside factors that limit the ability to obtain resources and quality care. This course discusses the populations that are more prone to inadequate care and the affect it has on their oral and overall health. It also highlights organizations, programs, and other initiatives working to improve all issues of access to care.

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Perio, Ortho, and Hygiene Concerns for the Adolescent Patient

Perio, Ortho, and Hygiene Concerns for the Adolescent Patient

Irreversible tissue damage from periodontal disease begins in late adolescence and early adulthood. With at least 41.5 million adolescents in the United States alone, dental professionals are responsible for helping adolescent patients become aware of the dangers of periodontal disease early on. This course will teach the important concerns related to the adolescent dental patient, as well as how to connect with the patient in order to give necessary recommendations.

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Radiography

Going Digital: Software

Going Digital: Software

The digital world is constantly evolving, and dental practices would benefit to keep up with it. By recognizing the different software types, understanding how they function and what their uses are, dental offices can become more efficient and organized. This course will explain the various software types on the market today, how they are an aid in the dental office, and how to choose which software is best for you.

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